Induction considerations for Employers

  • Give a named point of contact and their contact details including phone and email.
  • Ask what adjustments the person may need to do the job and agree a work-plan together and review points.
  • Ask the employee’s preferred means of communication when being given work e.g. verbal, written, email.
  • Ask the employee what support they require and what environments /tasks can cause them a challenge. e.g. noise, sound, movement, changing settings, talking in a large group.
  • Discuss specific adjustments as this will be dependent on each individual and the job e.g. alternatives to note taking in meetings; avoidance of making presentations in front of others; need for one base/desk to work from.
  • Create a shared document that records agreed actions which can be reviewed.
  • A process map of the job can be very helpful so that the person can ensure that they know what to do at each stage of the task. This is especially helpful if it is harder to remember oral instructions given.
  • Provide written/visual instructions on how to use equipment especially if have health and safety implications. Some people find filming new tasks on their phone helps them to remind themselves to check again if unsure.
  • Provide the rules of the workplace or training setting. Check for understanding.These should include information if required for example on clothing for different settings, times starting and finishing work; break times; etiquette for tea and coffee making; toilet breaks, and how to address different colleagues.
  • Discuss if the person needs assistance with organisational skills e.g. use of colour coding; diary reminders, setting alarms/reminders on computer/phone, setting up filing systems.
  • Discuss with the employee any particular environmental triggers and discuss together what could be reasonable solutions where possible e.g. turn lights off, use of ear plugs, office placement, sitting near window.
  • Provide templates/samples of letters, pro-formas or reports to show what is expected, if this is required to be undertaken as a part of the work.
  • Feedback explicitly, and sensitively if there are challenges and agree on actions, record and provide this to the employee and agree review dates.
  • Discuss the need for short and regular meetings.
  • Discuss where possible priorities for the day/week on a regular basis.
  • Discuss, where possible, expected work in advance. Clearly mark deadlines and review points.
  • Provide a list of appropriate abbreviations, acronyms, phrases and terms that are used in the workplace.
  • Demonstrate as well as discuss new tasks and break down tasks into parts to allow practice slowly and accurately before building up speed. Often people can learn the skills if they have time to practice them.
  • Avoid jokes and sarcasm that may be misinterpreted.
  • Discuss the need for flexible working if this is possible e.g. arriving earlier and leaving earlier to avoid large groups of people and making it easier and less stressful for travel/parking.